As of January 2014, the EBRP is discontinued.

The program has been replaced by the Elsevier metrics development program.


For more information please visit the EMDP website.



 

Granted Proposals: 2012

Team Members

Dr. Félix de Moya Anegón
Research Professor, SCImago Group, CSIC, CCHS, IPP
Dr. Vicente P. Guerrero Bote
University Professor, SCImago Group, University of Extremadura
Diego Guzman Morales
Computer Engineer, SCImago Group

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Project 1. Relationship between Usage and Citation and the influence of language


Although citation indicators are accepted by the international scientific community, they have problems of statistical significance and normalization that could have been originated by the lack of database coverage in certain areas, and the referencing habits in the different scientific areas.

Usage indicators represent a great potential due to the high amount of usage data that can be collected that can provide a great statistical significance. However, studies indicate that these are only loosely related with indicators based on impact. But, none of these studies have been conducted with an amount and reliability of data as that of ScienceDirect.

Thus our purpose is to study the relationship between citation and usage at journal level and the influence of language on it.

http://www.scimago.es

Contact information:
Vicente Guerrero:

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Team Members

Dr. Tim S. Evans
Senior Lecturer, Imperial College London
Webpage
Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Senior Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London
Webpage
Dr Renaud Lambiotte
Assistant Professor, University of Namur
Webpage
Dr Paul Expert
Post-Doc, King's College London

Project 2. Communities of knowledge, collaboration networks and the determinants of research performance


We will use Elsevier data on publications to map knowledge domains and to identify overlapping scientific communities. This will enable us to study the determinants of research performance, with a special focus on the role of interdisciplinarity. As we have data from different years we can look at how the features we find evolve in time. To identify interdisciplinary fields we will use apply our methods for uncovering overlapping scientific communities (Evans and Lambiotte 2009) to the data these are most appropriate communities for topics spanning several fields. Having defined the scientific communities, we will use them as proxies for disciplinary areas to which scientists can be assigned via their authorship of papers. This will enable us to study the effects of interdisciplinary on performance when authors belong to more than one community. We will use a number of relevant variables for each scientist, such as his or her degree of specialization or exposure to diverse knowledge pools (defined in terms of joint membership of scientific communities), the disciplinary background (using the position of the scientist in previous years or the departmental affiliation), institutional affiliation (we can use the methods of Expert at al 2011) to study the influence of distance) and the network position within the collaboration network. We will use measures based on citations to look at how this influences research success. We will also try to correlate our results with more detailed information we have on scientists at a single major UK institute (see Evans, Hopkins, and Kaube 2012) and on UK researchers in Business and Management Studies (Evans, Lambiotte and Panzarasa 2011).

Team Members

Christian Schlögl
Assoc. Prof. Dipl.-Ing.
University of Graz, Institute of Information Science and Information Systems, Universitätsstr. 15/F3,
A-8010 Graz, Austria
Juan Gorraiz
University of Vienna, Library and Archive Services, Bibliometrics Department, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna, Researcher
juan.gorraiz@univie.ac.at
Christian Gumpenberger
University of Vienna, Library and Archive Services, Bibliometrics Department, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna, Researcher
christian.gumpenberger@univie.ac.at
Peter Kraker
University of Graz, Institute of Information Science and Information Systems, and Know Center, PhD student
Herbert Vogl
University of Graz, Institute of Information Science and Information Systems, Master student

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Project 3. Usage versus citation indicators



Our study aims at investigating e-journal use on a broad scale and at elaborating communalities and differences in comparison to citation data. In particular, we plan to address the following issues:

  • 1. long-term growth in the use of electronic journals
  • 2. differences in obsolescence characteristics between citations and downloads
  • 3. comparison of download and citation frequencies, absolute and relative, at journal level and at article level; possibility to project citations on the basis of downloads
  • 4. effects of e-journals on formal scholarly communication in the past decade
  • 5. differences in the issues 1 to 4 among fields, especially between social sciences, humanities and natural sciences
  • 6. aspects which go beyond download statistics – for instance, motivations for downloads
  • 7. comparison with other sources providing quick impact assessments (for instance, Mendeley).

In order to achieve these goals, we will analyze download and citation data from ScienceDirect and Scopus. Analyses will be performed at journal and at article level. At journal level we will develop novel usage metrics similar to the particular citation indicators but also taking into account the particularities of download data. Furthermore, we plan to investigate the influence of download on citations, vice versa. Since analyses of log file data can only provide insights inherent to these data, we also plan to perform a survey in order to get a deeper understanding on article downloads from e-journals.

Contact information:
Christian Schlögl,
University of Graz, Institute of Information Science and Information Systems,
Universitätsstr. 15/F3, A-8010 Graz, Austria

ISSI2013 paper: Download vs. citation vs. readership data

ISSI2013 paper: Differences and similarities in usage versus citation

STI2013 paper: What do citations, downloads and readership data of an information systems journal have in common

Team Members

Jan Schulz
Research Associate, Chair of Management, Leadership and Human Resources, TU Bergakademie Freiberg
Webpage
Michael Nippa
Professor, Chair of Management, Leadership and Human Resources, TU Bergakademie Freiberg

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Project 4. Using co-author networks to measure the influences of social capital on research performance


Publication performance measurement as a measurement of research performance is important to evaluate scientists and research institutions. Especially career decisions of individuals are based on the output of ones research. Likewise, universities and institutions are evaluated based on the reputation gained from research output and funding is allocated based on it. In other areas of research, social capital has been shown to have an important influence on team performance, innovation success, career advancement or on entrepreneurial endeavors. All these areas face broadly similar problems and challenges as encountered by academic researchers: new knowledge must be generated and successfully transferred into measurable outputs. As such, it can be expected that social capital also influences performance of a researcher.

This project aims to investigate the impact of social capital on bibliometric measurements as indicators for research performance on an international scale and in different fields of research. Social capital will be measured in the co-authorship network with social network analysis metrics as a proxy. Additionally, the effects of 'special' social capital of particular linkages to key individuals like "research stars" or journal editors will be evaluated.

Contact information:
Phone: +49 (0)3731-39-2123
Fax: +49 (0)3731-39-3313
E-Mail:
Web: http://fak6.tu-freiberg.de/up/

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Team Members

Erjia Yan
Adjunct Instructor/ Doctoral Candidate, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Ying Ding
Assistant Professor, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Xiangnan Kong
Doctoral Candidate, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Project 5. Monitoring Scientific Knowledge Flow through Scholarly Networks


The production and creation of knowledge is not dependent on any individual and isolated entity; instead, knowledge is diffused, exchanged, and circulated among various entities. Studying scientific trading and knowledge flows within and across different disciplines can help us better understand the structure and characteristics of various scientific disciplines. Results from this study are expected to inform studies on disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, scientific collaboration, scientific knowledge flow and transfer patterns, etc. Therefore, the data sets powered by Elsevier will provide us with an indispensable medium to form appropriate scholarly networks, and to study evolving characteristics of various scientific disciplines.

Contact information:
Erjia Yan
1320 E 10th St., LI011, Bloomington, In 47405, USA
Phone: 812-606-8091
E-mail:

Team Members

Dr. Alesia Zuccala
Principal Investigator, Faculty of Humanities, University of Amsterdam
Prof. Dr. Rens Bod
Faculty of Humanities, University of Amsterdam
Dr. Raf Guns
University of Antwerp and University of Amsterdam

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Project 6. Citation Monitoring of University Press Prestige



Across a number of research subjects in the humanities, the book or monograph is the sine qua non of scholarly output. Often it is a strong requirement for academic promotion and tenure. When writing a book, the humanities scholar is likely to give serious consideration to the academic or university press with whom (s)he would like to publish. One of the deciding factors will be the 'prestige' of the press. Overall, what is important to the scholar "is that the resultant publication from a prestigious university press is read, reviewed, and cited; it is purchased by libraries; it is taken seriously" (Gump, 2006, p. 76).

The bibliometric literature pertaining to journal articles and research in the humanities indicates that monographs are predominantly cited (Nederhof, 2006; Thompson, 2002; Zuccala & van Leeuwen, 2011). Where monographs or books appear in the reference lists of journals, our aim is to determine if certain university/academic presses are cited more often than others. Due to the importance that humanities scholars place on choosing a press, one would expect to see the majority of citations to books published by those considered most 'prestigious'. Questions associated with this research include the following: How is university press 'prestige' reflected by natural journal citation practices in the humanities? Do certain journals direct more citations to books published by [x,y, z] press, or will the distribution of citations demonstrate openness to many publishers?

Contact information:
Dr Alesia Zuccala
E-mail:

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Team Members

Cinzia Daraio
Associate Professor, Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering
Irene Bongioanni
Research Fellow, Department of Physics, University of Rome La Sapienza
Claudio Leporelli
Full Professor, Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering
Giancarlo Ruocco
Full Professor, Department of Physics, University of Rome La Sapienza
Léopold Simar
Emeritus Professor, ISBA, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

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Project 7. Assessing the Scientific Performance of Regions and Countries at Disciplinary Level by means of Robust Nonparametric Methods: new indicators to measure regional and national Scientific Competitiveness


This project proposes new robust statistical methods to assess countries' regional and national scientific performance at disciplinary level, by using bibliometric indicators based on Elsevier's Scopus database. The proposed approach is well grounded in the recent literature and will provide powerful policy tools to assess the effectiveness of science policies over time and will offer rigorous empirical evidence and informative results for policy makers.

Contact information:
Prof. Cinzia Daraio
Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering "Antonio Ruberti", University of Rome "La Sapienza"
Via Ariosto, 25 (Ufficio A108)
00185 - Rome – Italy
Phone: (+39) 06 7727 4068
Fax: (+39) 06 7727 4074
E-mail:

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Team Members

Julia Melkers,
Associate Professor

Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Public Policy, Atlanta, GA, USA
Diogo Pinheiro
Postdoc
Kaspars Berzins
Doctoral Student
Jian Wang
Doctoral Student
Agrita Kiopa
ABD
Eric Welch,
Associate Professor

Department of Public Administration, Chicago, IL, USA
Marla Parker
Doctoral Student
Yamini Jha
University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Public Administration

Project 8. Social Networks and Collaboration: Combining NETWISE and SCOPUS Data for Research on Science


Social scientists have emphasized the importance of social capital in shaping important aspects of professional development and advancement such as career paths, economic opportunities, and professional recognition. The networked theory of social capital argues that the social networks in which individuals interact, provide access to critical resources. Ties to other individuals represent potential pathways to resources, information, visibility and influence that are critical for career success. One approach to understanding the impact of social networks on scientific production is to focus not only on how much social networks matter for key outcomes, but how the structural and relational aspects of networks may work differently across disciplines, institutions, or vary by demographic or other characteristics. This proposal outlines a unique opportunity to combine data bases that will allow for the exploration of a range of issues specific to scientific productivity and careers, and the role of networks on these processes. It combines the strength of a robust bibliometric dataset with a unique and detailed national NSF-funded social network survey of academic scientists. The potential ability to integrate secondary bibliometric data provided by Elsevier into our existing NSF funded research on scientists' careers significantly increases our ability to address issues of collaboration, productivity, mobility, and other career outcomes in the context of detailed social and human capital, and varied institutional environments. . With this proposal we have the opportunity to address research questions that have been limited in both the survey research and bibliometric communities through the merging of two significant data sources.

Contact information:
Prof. Cinzia Daraio
Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering "Antonio Ruberti", University of Rome "La Sapienza"
Via Ariosto, 25 (Ufficio A108)
00185 - Rome – Italy
Phone: (+39) 06 7727 4068
Fax: (+39) 06 7727 4074
E-mail:
Web: http://www.spp.gatech.edu/aboutus/faculty/JuliaMelkers

Eric Welch, Associate Professor
Public Administration (M/C 278)
138 CUPPA Hall
Phone: 312-413-2416
E-mail:
Web: http://www.uic.edu/cuppa/pa/faculty/welch.html